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class143
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PostSubject: Question about branch lines in the USA   Fri Dec 19, 2008 9:28 am

Hi everyone

Can someone help me please. For a mini project I'm doing a small branch line (or Subdivision I think it's called in the United States) based on a rural American route. My main question is what type of rolling stock is usually used on these small rural branchlines?

Cheers Very Happy
Jamie
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kc2rxo
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PostSubject: Re: Question about branch lines in the USA   Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:10 pm

Hi Jamie,

If you want a branch line here in the US take a look at Lehigh Valley's Auburn Division. Very country like, actually went through my town where I live when it was in operation. Smile

It has an old style to it but you can update it if you like.
The Auburn Division usually ran milk trains, general goods, passenger, and other odds and end things.

Just a few quick ideas here. Cool

Cheers,
Adam What a Face
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PostSubject: Re: Question about branch lines in the USA   Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:45 pm

Hi Jamie,

I guess it depends on the industries and location. I guess generally speaking, farming and very low density areas could have things like fertilizer plants which would call for covered hoppers for Potash and fertilizer finished product loading, tankers for molten sulfur and Anhydrous ammonia and even Phosphoric Acid. Often times you get lumber distributions and yards in the area so you get 73 foot center beam flats, bulkhead flats for lumber loading and box cars. Another industry that you will encounter is grain elevators either for storage or for food or feed processing (ie) Kelloggs, Pillsbury, Quakers, Ralston Purina, etc; and they take covered hoppers either 3bay, 4bay, PS hoppers, or cylindrical. Other industries include paper mills which calls for box cars, pulpwood cars (sometimes), kaolin or clay slurry tank cars (sometimes), 2bay ps or centerflow hoppers for sodium chlorate loading (sometimes) and wood chip gondolas (sometimes); general distribution facilities or transloading facilities that interface with trucking companies in which case that could include any kind of railcar; scrap yards which call for gondolas.

Often times you will have what are known as "branch plant towns" where there is one big industry and a town basically is the workers for it-these industries usually include large steel mills (coil cars and gondolas, coal cars, ore cars, steel mill support cars (ie) slag cars (maddy25 has some nice steel mill cars), scrap gondolas); oil refineries (oil tankers of various sizes, covered hoppers (a few), sulphuric acid cars and other tank cars for petrochemical loading); Coal mines (coal hoppers or bethgons) which are usually in the hills or mountains near by; lumber mills; major paper mills such as Weyerhauser and International Paper; and auto plants either for assembly (autoracks, 60 foot boxes, 86 foot boxes, 89 foot flat cars for frame chassis) or parts (everything but the autoracks-depending on what they produce).

I guess it does really depend on the type of area you are looking to model.

Best Regards,
Andrew
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class143
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PostSubject: Re: Question about branch lines in the USA   Fri Dec 19, 2008 1:11 pm

kc2rxo wrote:
Hi Jamie,

If you want a branch line here in the US take a look at Lehigh Valley's Auburn Division. Very country like, actually went through my town where I live when it was in operation. Smile

It has an old style to it but you can update it if you like.
The Auburn Division usually ran milk trains, general goods, passenger, and other odds and end things.

Just a few quick ideas here. Cool

Cheers,
Adam What a Face

Hi, thanks Adam, will take a look at that Very Happy

great_lakes wrote:

Hi Jamie,

I guess it depends on the
industries and location. I guess generally speaking, farming and very
low density areas could have things like fertilizer plants which would
call for covered hoppers for Potash and fertilizer finished product
loading, tankers for molten sulfur and Anhydrous ammonia and even
Phosphoric Acid. Often times you get lumber distributions and yards in
the area so you get 73 foot center beam flats, bulkhead flats for
lumber loading and box cars. Another industry that you will encounter
is grain elevators either for storage or for food or feed processing
(ie) Kelloggs, Pillsbury, Quakers, Ralston Purina, etc; and they take
covered hoppers either 3bay, 4bay, PS hoppers, or cylindrical. Other
industries include paper mills which calls for box cars, pulpwood cars
(sometimes), kaolin or clay slurry tank cars (sometimes), 2bay ps or
centerflow hoppers for sodium chlorate loading (sometimes) and wood
chip gondolas (sometimes); general distribution facilities or
transloading facilities that interface with trucking companies in which
case that could include any kind of railcar; scrap yards which call for
gondolas.

Often times you will have what are known as "branch
plant towns" where there is one big industry and a town basically is
the workers for it-these industries usually include large steel mills
(coil cars and gondolas, coal cars, ore cars, steel mill support cars
(ie) slag cars (maddy25 has some nice steel mill cars), scrap
gondolas); oil refineries (oil tankers of various sizes, covered
hoppers (a few), sulphuric acid cars and other tank cars for
petrochemical loading); Coal mines (coal hoppers or bethgons) which are
usually in the hills or mountains near by; lumber mills; major paper
mills such as Weyerhauser and International Paper; and auto plants
either for assembly (autoracks, 60 foot boxes, 86 foot boxes, 89 foot
flat cars for frame chassis) or parts (everything but the
autoracks-depending on what they produce).

I guess it does really depend on the type of area you are looking to model.

Best Regards,
Andrew

Thanks aswell for that Andrew Very Happy I'm going to model a smaller rural town so I think the things like Fertilizer and logging and grain. Smile

The layout I'm doing is based on a model railway that was on a free CD in a magazine. The layout was a small rural town served by around 1 train a week (not in real time when operating it though!) for things like lumber etc. I want to do a similar thing but put in a passenger service if I can (though this would rarely be served apart from one train per day) In the modern day but the line was kept open for a reason which I'm still working on. Can I ask what type of trains form branch line services in the United states. Eg has America used common sense and kept loco hauled trains, or has it followed Britain by using DMUs?

Cheers

Jamie Very Happy
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great_lakes
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PostSubject: Re: Question about branch lines in the USA   Fri Dec 19, 2008 2:35 pm

I'm glad I could help Very Happy

I forgot to mention with the logging industry, you will get those staked log cars. I believe if you go to the DLS and type in 45ft log and 50ft log, you will get loadable US roadname cars. Also, for the logging industry, there are a number of loads and vehicles American Connections made (can't remember his full user name). Generally speaking, if you type in logging or logs in the DLS either for the phrase or description, you should get a fine selection of items.

For the grain items, I recommend looking the grain complexes made by Bendorsey to see if you like them. Also, Ish6 (Ishie) has made some cool and huge grain facilities plus a fertilizer complex too I believe.

As far as the small time switching roads, there are a few. The shortlines as well call them, are numerous although a good few of them are under the umbrella of shortline conglomorates such as Genesse&Wyoming, Rail America and Guilford or although small, they are big enough to hold their own and have a wide variety of their own rollingstock such as Florida East Coast, Montana Rail link and Arkansas Oklahoma Railroad; there are just a couple that are only big enough. Here are a few railroads that I believe meet your criteria of you layout

Cascade and Colombia Railroad (western US)
City of Prineville Railroad (western US-operates between UP and BNSF)
Finger lakes Railroad (eastern US)

As far as using DMUs for switching, I don't see that happening because the tonnage is too heavy for that. Shortlines typically use beat up barely running Alcos such as S2 to S4s and RS18s to more common units such as ex Class 1 railroads' SW1200, SW1500, road slugs, GP7, GP9, GP38, GP40 and even the odd B39-8, C30-7, SD40 and F40phs (Montreal Maine Atlantic)

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=158206&nseq=8

The larger shortlines have bought larger road units such as ES4400s (Iowa Interstate) and SD70ACE (Montana Rail link) and SD70-2 (Florida East Coast).

Sometimes, they will lease locomotives from leasing companies (ie) CEFX, LLPX, HATX, GATX, etc.

Best Regards,
Andrew
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class143
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PostSubject: Re: Question about branch lines in the USA   Mon Dec 22, 2008 4:57 pm

Cheers for that Andrew Very Happy Very Happy That's great help thank you. Would try and download some of the items you have mentioned but the DLS isn't working for me Mad

Many thanks for your help

Jamie
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PostSubject: Re: Question about branch lines in the USA   Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:09 pm

Yes, the DLS is being a pain in the you know where tonight for some reason...... Neutral
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